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Thread: Biotin

  1. #11

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    I thank you for the reply. I am reviewing you detailed reply. While my analysis may be less detailed it think that it's basic analysis is not excluded my your description. Anyway I will gladly accept you explanation. The aspirin reaction is a true fact. I would be most pleased if you have any suggestion as to how to lower the tinnitus volume that I hear. You really you seem to have a more experienced analysis than I gave and would really like to reduce my tinnitus. All my medications are constant when I take the Aspirin so if I can reverse whatever the Aspirin does it might be helpful, thanks the Gripper.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gripper View Post
    I thank you for the reply. I am reviewing you detailed reply. While my analysis may be less detailed it think that it's basic analysis is not excluded my your description. Anyway I will gladly accept you explanation. The aspirin reaction is a true fact. I would be most pleased if you have any suggestion as to how to lower the tinnitus volume that I hear. You really you seem to have a more experienced analysis than I gave and would really like to reduce my tinnitus. All my medications are constant when I take the Aspirin so if I can reverse whatever the Aspirin does it might be helpful, thanks the Gripper.
    I'm not a Doctor and really don't want to go into their prescriptive territory.

    I would say you probably need to assess the failure of each potential mechanism and see whether you are addressing the correct cause rather than just throwing drugs at it IMHO.

    I have several clients with a reported improvement in tinnitus from wearing hearing aids, but I also have a couple of clients who don't seem to derive the same level of benefit.
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  3. #13

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    I have studied you supplied section on the cochlea which seems to agree that the taking of Aspirin would have the potential to alter the operation of the cochlea so as to effect the precption of what I call Tinnitus. Any thoughts as to what I could do to reduce it. Having hearing aids seems to improve the signal to noise ratio and therfore provide improved precption of the signal (say speech or music) over the noise (say tinnitus) so reducing the noise will improve my "hearing" thanks in advance. The Gripper
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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Um bongo View Post
    I'm not a Doctor and really don't want to go into their prescriptive territory.

    I would say you probably need to assess the failure of each potential mechanism and see whether you are addressing the correct cause rather than just throwing drugs at it IMHO.

    I have several clients with a reported improvement in tinnitus from wearing hearing aids, but I also have a couple of clients who don't seem to derive the same level of benefit.
    Please be advised I am not throwing drugs tinnitus. As a matter of fact the only drug that has effected the Tinnitus was the Aspirin that was taken as a gentle blood thinner for cardio reasons. But since it seems to effect the tinnitus what might do the opposite of what the aspirin does.Thanks the Gripper
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gripper View Post
    Any thoughts as to what I could do to reduce it.
    To simplify things: Tinnitus is a mind game. It often begins in the ear, but it is maintained by the brain--sometimes even in the absence of what set it off at the ear level in the first place. The more you pay attention to it, the louder it will get over time. The better you get at ignoring it, the softer it will get. If the tinnitus is perceived as some sort of warning signal (e.g. "oh no, it's a tumor!) it will get louder over time because the brain is very interested in things that are novel, important, or dangerous. If the tinnitus is perceived as neutral or unimportant, the brain will slowly fade it into the background as it does the hum of your fridge or the feeling of your clothing. The tinnitus will probably always be with you, and will be there if you stop and listen hard for it, or will be there if your body is under more stress that usual (you're sick, you're tired, you're hungover, etc.), but the better you get at ignoring and not worrying over it the softer it will get over time and the longer the periods will be when you don't notice it. You have some level of cognitive control over this, but at the times when it is particularly bothersome I'd recommend throwing on some music and masking it out and then engaging in whatever stress-lowering thing you do to avoid strengthening those bad-tinnitus-stress-time neural connections.

    This isn't a satisfying answer and it is a slow solution, but it is the best answer at this time. Apart from certain pre-existing deficiencies, which have been mentioned, there is no magic pill. Apart from Meneire's, there's is no evidence that salt has any effect on tinnitus (and evidence of the effectiveness of low-salt diets for Meniere's patients is pretty limited). Don't worry about caffeine or alcohol--if you are in withdrawal from caffeine of if you are hung-over the tinnitus will probably get worse, but only because your body is under more stress than normal and the tinnitus will go back down as you recover. There are lots and lots of internet scams trying to take your money for the promise of some sort of instant cure, ignore them all.

    Live your life, distract yourself from your tinnitus, spend as little time thinking about it as possible, and it will calm down over time. It you tend to be an anxious person or have issues with depression, you might need extra help to do this.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neville View Post
    To simplify things: Tinnitus is a mind game. It often begins in the ear, but it is maintained by the brain--sometimes even in the absence of what set it off at the ear level in the first place. The more you pay attention to it, the louder it will get over time. The better you get at ignoring it, the softer it will get. If the tinnitus is perceived as some sort of warning signal (e.g. "oh no, it's a tumor!) it will get louder over time because the brain is very interested in things that are novel, important, or dangerous. If the tinnitus is perceived as neutral or unimportant, the brain will slowly fade it into the background as it does the hum of your fridge or the feeling of your clothing. The tinnitus will probably always be with you, and will be there if you stop and listen hard for it, or will be there if your body is under more stress that usual (you're sick, you're tired, you're hungover, etc.), but the better you get at ignoring and not worrying over it the softer it will get over time and the longer the periods will be when you don't notice it. You have some level of cognitive control over this, but at the times when it is particularly bothersome I'd recommend throwing on some music and masking it out and then engaging in whatever stress-lowering thing you do to avoid strengthening those bad-tinnitus-stress-time neural connections.

    This isn't a satisfying answer and it is a slow solution, but it is the best answer at this time. Apart from certain pre-existing deficiencies, which have been mentioned, there is no magic pill. Apart from Meneire's, there's is no evidence that salt has any effect on tinnitus (and evidence of the effectiveness of low-salt diets for Meniere's patients is pretty limited). Don't worry about caffeine or alcohol--if you are in withdrawal from caffeine of if you are hung-over the tinnitus will probably get worse, but only because your body is under more stress than normal and the tinnitus will go back down as you recover. There are lots and lots of internet scams trying to take your money for the promise of some sort of instant cure, ignore them all.

    Live your life, distract yourself from your tinnitus, spend as little time thinking about it as possible, and it will calm down over time. It you tend to be an anxious person or have issues with depression, you might need extra help to do this.
    this has to be one of the best thought-out words of wisdom I have read on tinnitus.

  7. #17

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    My worry is the opposite. I simply don't notice it, until I notice it. And then I really notice it! Sometimes this is really bad when I wake up in the morning, but then I get distracted. I'm scared that one day I'll start noticing it all the time, and then I won't be able to stop.
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  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by corona View Post
    I'm scared that one day I'll start noticing it all the time, and then I won't be able to stop.
    I don't think this will happen. Don't worry about it.

    Also, are you a coffee drinker? If so, you are in withdrawal first thing in the morning. That can have an effect on the perceived intensity of the tinnitus. Not so much the "actual" intensity (if such a thing can be said). For the most part, tinnitus loudness matching in the clinic stays very consistent and generally is quite soft. The loudness perception of tinnitus is different from the loudness perception of outside sounds and is very dependent on brain state.

    JustEd, thank you.

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