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Thread: Check my ears are clean and the audiometry are enough to reject the possibility I have also a conductive problem?

  1. Default Check my ears are clean and the audiometry are enough to reject the possibility I have also a conductive problem?

    Audiologists only checked my ears are clean and then do an audiometry. (You can check my audiometry in my signature)

    Then said me: You have "Bilateral SensoriNeural Hearing Loss"
    and I say: "Ok"

    (it is hereditary -my grandmother, my father, my aunt and my uncle have the same problem)

    Check my ears are clean and the audiometry are enough to reject the possibility I have also a conductive problem?

    Regards
    *Bilateral SensoriNeural Hearing Loss

    *My Hearing Aids:
    2 BINAX PURE 7BX Siemens
    with
    minireceiver 2M
    with
    semi open click dome

    *My InsituGram with Connexx 7.5:

    Hidden Content


  2. #2
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    Default

    No, they should be doing a bone conduction test too as a minimum. Tests shown on here without BC levels are incomplete, as the prescription changes quite dramatically when there's a BC component.

    AND for the record the in-situ result is not really the best audiogram to use/show as it's uncalibrated and will differ from your normal audiogram for a variety of reasons.
    Last edited by Um bongo; 05-16-2016 at 04:19 AM.
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  3. #3

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    If they tested both air conductivity and bone conductivity the graph of your audiogram should show two lines for each ear, one line for what you hear by air and one for what you hear through bone conductivity. If there's a big difference between the two, that shows you have a conductive loss.

    I had both sensorineural loss and conductivty loss in my left ear. For instance, at 500 Hz my hearing threshhold was 100 dB by air, 50 dB by bone.
    Freq: Right Left
    250 40 60
    500 50 65
    1000 50 60
    2000 45 45
    4000 65 70
    8000 9070

    Right: SRT=50 dB, WRS 92% at 70 dB
    Left: SRT=60 dB, WRS 80% at 80 dB

    Had stapedotomy on left ear in May, 2015. Prior to that had a severe/profound loss across all frequencies in my left ear.

    Widex220

  4. Default

    Hello Guys. I just find 2 tests with both: air and bone.

    https://goo.gl/RDLim1
    https://goo.gl/y2qH2f

    I see differences. Both professional told me I have only sensorineural hearing loss. But I see at least in the first test (December 9) big differences.

    What do you think?


    Quote Originally Posted by Um bongo View Post
    No, they should be doing a bone conduction test too as a minimum. Tests shown on here without BC levels are incomplete, as the prescription changes quite dramatically when there's a BC component.

    AND for the record the in-situ result is not really the best audiogram to use/show as it's uncalibrated and will differ from your normal audiogram for a variety of reasons.
    Quote Originally Posted by daisymae View Post
    If they tested both air conductivity and bone conductivity the graph of your audiogram should show two lines for each ear, one line for what you hear by air and one for what you hear through bone conductivity. If there's a big difference between the two, that shows you have a conductive loss.

    I had both sensorineural loss and conductivty loss in my left ear. For instance, at 500 Hz my hearing threshhold was 100 dB by air, 50 dB by bone.
    *Bilateral SensoriNeural Hearing Loss

    *My Hearing Aids:
    2 BINAX PURE 7BX Siemens
    with
    minireceiver 2M
    with
    semi open click dome

    *My InsituGram with Connexx 7.5:

    Hidden Content


  5. #5

    Default

    Thank you for posting the graphs! I think the important thing is the second test does not show a difference between the air and bone results. Maybe you had a cold or some other temporary problem at the time of the first test? Things like sinus congestion or a middle ear infection or ear wax in the ear canal can cause a temporary problem. Things like otosclerosis and neuroma would cause a conductive loss which doesn't come and go.
    Freq: Right Left
    250 40 60
    500 50 65
    1000 50 60
    2000 45 45
    4000 65 70
    8000 9070

    Right: SRT=50 dB, WRS 92% at 70 dB
    Left: SRT=60 dB, WRS 80% at 80 dB

    Had stapedotomy on left ear in May, 2015. Prior to that had a severe/profound loss across all frequencies in my left ear.

    Widex220

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daisymae View Post
    Thank you for posting the graphs! I think the important thing is the second test does not show a difference between the air and bone results. Maybe you had a cold or some other temporary problem at the time of the first test? Things like sinus congestion or a middle ear infection or ear wax in the ear canal can cause a temporary problem. Things like otosclerosis and neuroma would cause a conductive loss which doesn't come and go.
    Hello,
    The first test (9-12-15 = december 9 of 2015) was at 4pm
    is one day before the second test (10-12-15 = december 10 of 2015) was at 11am

    I think I didn't had a cold or similar.
    The first doctor is young, so maybe was an error.

    Anyway, in previous years I remember air and bone did not have too much differences.

    So, if there are not differences between air and bone, can be reject the possibility of a conductivity problem and say my problem is only of the inner hear?

    Regards
    *Bilateral SensoriNeural Hearing Loss

    *My Hearing Aids:
    2 BINAX PURE 7BX Siemens
    with
    minireceiver 2M
    with
    semi open click dome

    *My InsituGram with Connexx 7.5:

    Hidden Content


  7. #7

    Default

    Hello, sorry to hijack this thread, but I was hoping you (daisymae) could clarify something in your response for me? I am still learning about all of this stuff and hopefully you will be able to help because how I have been reading my audiogram doesn't coincide with your response. I am likely wrong, hence would like the clarification haha

    If Pepito had conductive hearing loss in the first test, but not the second, would a cold only be an explanation if the air conduction results in the second test moved up to match the bone conduction results? This would be because he no longer had the cold and his air conduction improved up to what his bone conduction threshold was?

    By my interpretation, if his bone conduction threshold moved down to where his air conduction threshold, then that would be an increase in sensorineural loss?

    Genuinely I am not sure, I have been researching what my audiogram means for the past few days and what I had surmised was that the bone conduction line is basically what your sensorineural loss is and the air conduction line is your conductive loss (assuming they are more than 10dbl apart). Mine, for example, was mixed when I went on Monday, with b-c hovering around 35-45 and a-c around 40s-60s, with them meeting at a couple frequencies in each ear. I interpreted this as, if I were diagnosed with something that could fix the conductive hearing loss (which would mean my a-c line would move up), I could only ever hope to have hearing at the level of my b-c threshold because that represents what my inner ear can hear, the damage to which is generally permanent.

    I hope this all made sense! Thanks!

  8. #8

    Default

    IMNSHO, you need at least a third independent test to determine which of the first two are closer to being correct.

  9. #9

    Default

    snowite, I think what you're saying matches my understanding. With the bone conduction test the sound is going straight to the cochlea. If you can't hear the sound, it's because of damage to the cochlea or the auditory nerve.

    With the air conduction test the sound has to travel down the ear canal, vibrate the ear drum, and then vibrate the three bones in the middle ear before the sound gets to the cochlea. So wax in the ear canal, a ruptured ear drum, gooey mucous in the middle ear or excess deposits of bone in the middle ear could all stop the sound, and that would be a conductive loss.

    I am not a doctor!

    They told me they want to see a pretty big gap between the air conduction scores and bone conduction scores before they'll recommend surgery for otosclerosis. I can't remember if they specified at least 15, 20, or 25 dB as the gap size.

    In my left ear my scores were:
    500 Hz Air 100 Bone 50
    1000 Hz Air 90 Bone 55
    2000 Hz Air 80 Bone 65
    4000 Hz Air 100 Bone 50

    Only my left ear has otosclerosis. In my right ear, the air and bone scores were identical at some frequencies and about 5 dB apart in some. After surgery in my left ear my scores came up to 5 dB below the original bone conduction scores, except at 2000 Hz, which came up to 45 dB compared to the 55 dB I had hoped for -- a nice surprise.

    After the surgery I got hearing aids and I am hearing in the normal range now. I really didn't expect that and I'm very pleased.
    Freq: Right Left
    250 40 60
    500 50 65
    1000 50 60
    2000 45 45
    4000 65 70
    8000 9070

    Right: SRT=50 dB, WRS 92% at 70 dB
    Left: SRT=60 dB, WRS 80% at 80 dB

    Had stapedotomy on left ear in May, 2015. Prior to that had a severe/profound loss across all frequencies in my left ear.

    Widex220

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