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Thread: Battery Test Data, Contributed by one of our Members

  1. #21

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    Went to SAM's club in Las Vegas, NV a couple of days to go to buy 312's. I have always bought them there because of the great price. They were not in the usual location by the pharmacy so I asked the pharmacist where they had moved them. He said that they no were no longer carrying HA batteries. Suggested I go to Wal-Mart :-(

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    854

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFP View Post
    Went to SAM's club in Las Vegas, NV a couple of days to go to buy 312's. I have always bought them there because of the great price. They were not in the usual location by the pharmacy so I asked the pharmacist where they had moved them. He said that they no were no longer carrying HA batteries. Suggested I go to Wal-Mart :-(
    I know a great place to get hearing aid batteries at a really decent price, better than most stores even. And the shipping is free even. And they have great brands, like the Power Ones. Just click on the link on the top right corner of this page to be taken to our host's web site, www.localbattery.com . They may not be local to you, except by mail, but you'll have the satisfaction of not only saving money, but also of helping to keep this great forum ALIVE!

    My wife was initially against buying such a small item online, but I told her I wanted to give them a try. She has no qualms about my doing so now. And after two orders, I'm a steady and happy customer.
    Last edited by Neilk; 01-30-2011 at 09:59 AM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Kansas City MO
    Posts
    2

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    Interesting study, although I'm not sure I understand it all. I've been using Rayovac zinc air batteries for many years. I buy them at Costco for around .50 each. They last between 14-15 days with an average of 15 hours use per day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by curiousengineer View Post
    Hi,

    I'm an Electronics Engineer and I have designed and built many battery chargers in my time. The battery testing method outlined here is quite flawed. The battery voltage will fluctuate non-linearly as it discharges.

    The best way to calculate mAh is to put a constant-current load on the battery and log the voltage vs. time. This means a circuit slightly more complex than a purely resistive load.

    FYI, mAH is not the only factor since batteries have an internal resistance. If they are used in a higher drain hearing aid the battery life will be affected by more than just the increase in current draw (i.e. more than a straight mAh calculation), there will be power loss with in the battery itself.

    So, it's also important to characterize the battery "impedance" or the battery's own internal resistance.

    I don't have something designed right now, but I'm interested in whipping something up to properly test the cells. A family member has recently started wearing hearing aids and I want to make sure they get the best possible lifetime out of the cells.

    - curiousengineer
    As another EE and a 20 year veteran of wearing aids, I respectively disagree with my colleague. He is correct in that the classic method of testing batteries for mAh is as he desdcribes. However, when evaluating hearing aid batteries for use in aids then I think the method he used is quite good. Even better would be to put the batteries into a hearing aid and wait for the end of use beep. This I have done earlier but with rechargeable batteries (NiMH) I just recharge over night and go for another day.

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    I have been using hearing aids for years and have been curious about which battery works the best. There are so many discussion boards about which battery last the most, so I decided to test them for myself. I bought a data acquisition system from Futek Instruments. It comes with a software that collects data and graphs them on your computer. It will tell you exact what the voltage, impedance, resistance.. etc... Just go to their website at futekinst.com and browse through their DAQ product line. Affordable and easy to use. Use their products to find out which battery works the best. You would be surprised. Not all name brands come out on top.

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    I use Rayovac size 10 for my Starkey 1600 aids and I have to replace them every 4 days. I also used the Audiologist's brand and they also had to be replaced every 4 days. It gets quite expensive.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    3,520

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    Buying HA's is a lot like buying cars or houses, no one thinks about how much gas a car is going use to drive x number of miles, all they know is they like the car. Same thing with a house, most people don't ask how much the property tax is, all they know is they like the house,then they get the tax bill in the mail and then they are shocked! Then there are HA's, most want ones that are as small as possible or can't be seen and then are shocked when they find out they are going though batteries every 3-4 days. If a HA uses a size 10 battery the best you can hope for is probably 5 days but that would be a stretch.
    Oticon Agil Pro w/streamer

    -250 500 1000 1500 2000 3000 4000 6000 8000
    L 10--5----10----30---50----70----85---80---80
    R 5--10----20----35---45----85----85--100--100

    SP Disc ------------- SRT
    L 88% @55db ------- L-10
    R 90% @55db------- R-25

  8. #28

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    Thanks for the information alot to consider when buying that first pair of aids.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana USA
    Posts
    23

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    Quote Originally Posted by seb View Post
    Buying HA's is a lot like buying cars or houses, no one thinks about how much gas a car is going use to drive x number of miles, all they know is they like the car. Same thing with a house, most people don't ask how much the property tax is, all they know is they like the house,then they get the tax bill in the mail and then they are shocked! Then there are HA's, most want ones that are as small as possible or can't be seen and then are shocked when they find out they are going though batteries every 3-4 days. If a HA uses a size 10 battery the best you can hope for is probably 5 days but that would be a stretch.
    seb, I have to disagree, MANY people take taxes and gas milage into acccount when those purchases are made. Not all but many!
    LEFT RIGHT
    250/20 25
    500/25 20
    1000/15 15
    2000/25 30
    3000/80 80
    4000/85 95
    6000/105 110
    8000/105 100

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Southeast TN
    Posts
    104

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    The term alluded to is TCO (total cost of ownership).

    Many people look at how much money they are saving at the initial purchase ... it is the only thing that matters.

    Cheap usually means corners were cut and in the long run the maintenence and other ownership costs grossly exceed purchasing a quality solution in the first place.

    For example, in my profession there are people that want to purchase the cheapest electric motor they can to keep the project costs down. What I try to educate them on is if motor cost is only 93%-97% of the total cost of ownership. The rest of that money is going to be electricity. Spending extra at the initial project, using VFD's and expensive shielded cable and motor grounding rings will save them tens of thousands of dollars over the life of the motor. Yes, the initial installation costs were doubled, however the payback is astronomical.

    Another example is buying a cheap used car that gets 12 miles per gallon. They have all that power, however all their money goes on fuel. They cannot afford to maintain it properly, put the cheapest tires they can afford and replace them every year. The costs snowball into a money pit that become increasingly unsustainable over time. These people never get ahead because they keep throwing good money into a bad investment.

    Yet they refuse to spend the extra twenty percent to buy a vehicle that will be much more economical to operate in the long run.

    It is not that they cannot afford it ... It is because they cannot afford NOT to. Ignorance is curable.
    250 - 20 - 35
    500 - 15 - 35
    1000 - 30 - 35
    2000 - 40 - 40
    3000 - 50 - 50
    4000 - 45 - 55
    6000 - 55 - 60
    8000 - 60 - 60
    SRT - 35 - 30
    SD% - 96 - 96
    SDHL - 60 - 60

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