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Thread: Upgrade from Phonak Savia Art

  1. #1

    Default Upgrade from Phonak Savia Art

    Hi,

    I've been wearing the Phonak Savia Art for about three years and want to upgrade next year to a new aid, preferably a premium model of similar quality. Can anybody make any recommendations for the upgrade. This includes any known releases that will be coming out in the next year.

    Thanks in advance.

    Graham

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glucas View Post
    Hi,

    I've been wearing the Phonak Savia Art for about three years and want to upgrade next year to a new aid, preferably a premium model of similar quality. Can anybody make any recommendations for the upgrade. This includes any known releases that will be coming out in the next year.

    Thanks in advance.

    Graham
    The Exelia Art is the generational successor to the Savia Art and offers many new and exciting features. If however, you are willing to wait until April/May 2010 then you might find even better hearing aids of a totaly new generation available to you, thus skipping one generation. This is purely based on the current development cycle and is subject to change. Knowing what some of the features in development are, as discussed at past conferences, you might be better off waiting until then.Broadband WIreless capability will be in its second iteration and super directionality and maybe even active occlusion redution might be introduced. These are likley to significantly improve on hearing in noise.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for this.

    Could I please ask a few questions ?

    Is super directionality the next big leap in hearing aid technology ?

    What improvements in the signal to noise ratio figures will super directionality bring ?

    What are the advantages of wireless broadband ? And not having much understanding of the technology, I assume to use this, you will always need to plug in a bluetooth adapter/transmitter somewhere, like the TV, the mobile phone etc...

    Many Thanks

    Graham
    Last edited by glucas; 07-26-2009 at 12:11 PM. Reason: Spelling Mistakes.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glucas View Post
    Thanks for this.

    Could I please ask a few questions ?

    Is super directionality the next big leap in hearing aid technology ?

    What improvements in the signal to noise ratio figures will super directionality bring ?

    What are the advantages of wireless broadband ? And not having much understanding of the technology, I assume to use this, you will always need to plug in a bluetooth adapter/transmitter somewhere, like the TV, the mobile phone etc...

    Many Thanks

    Graham
    No worries:

    1) Super directionility is defined (as far as I currently understand it) as a directional multimicrophone array (possibly through the use of broad band wireless body area networks using two mics on each aid to give an array of 4 mics) that has a directivity index of at least 7dB. Each 1dB increase in directivity index leads to a 10 to15% improved ability to understand speech in background noise compared to the omni directional setting. If you combine this with adaptive electronic occlusion control which means we can block the ear canal without occlusion, the hearing aid is in full control of all sounds entering the ear canal, thus dramatically improving noise reduction. Currently all vented hearing aid configurations allow noise to enter the ear through the vent, whihc reduces the effect of the electronic noise reduction in the aid.

    2) Wireless broadband allows bluetooth connection to the wide area through a neck worn bluetooth interface and batterypack (as bluetooth uses much more power than a hearing aid battery can contain). And yes, you will still need a bluetooth adapter for tv etc until manufacturers integrate bluetooth into these devices. This is not the only or even the main use. It is simply a possibility opened up due to broad band wireless.

    The main functionality comes into play between the two aids so that they can work together to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio such as potentially used in some superdirectional arrays or as used currently by Phonak to offer ZoomControl in the Exelia Art, Naida IX and Audeo YES IX. Phonak has always been way ahead in directional hearing aid technology Zoom control is simply a step towards Super Directionality, which is why is strongly suspect we will see it in their next generation top end aids.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hearnow View Post
    No worries:

    1) Super directionility is defined (as far as I currently understand it) as a directional multimicrophone array (possibly through the use of broad band wireless body area networks using two mics on each aid to give an array of 4 mics) that has a directivity index of at least 7dB. Each 1dB increase in directivity index leads to a 10 to15% improved ability to understand speech in background noise compared to the omni directional setting. If you combine this with adaptive electronic occlusion control which means we can block the ear canal without occlusion, the hearing aid is in full control of all sounds entering the ear canal, thus dramatically improving noise reduction. Currently all vented hearing aid configurations allow noise to enter the ear through the vent, whihc reduces the effect of the electronic noise reduction in the aid.

    2) Wireless broadband allows bluetooth connection to the wide area through a neck worn bluetooth interface and batterypack (as bluetooth uses much more power than a hearing aid battery can contain). And yes, you will still need a bluetooth adapter for tv etc until manufacturers integrate bluetooth into these devices. This is not the only or even the main use. It is simply a possibility opened up due to broad band wireless.

    The main functionality comes into play between the two aids so that they can work together to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio such as potentially used in some superdirectional arrays or as used currently by Phonak to offer ZoomControl in the Exelia Art, Naida IX and Audeo YES IX. Phonak has always been way ahead in directional hearing aid technology Zoom control is simply a step towards Super Directionality, which is why is strongly suspect we will see it in their next generation top end aids.
    having 2 aids so they can work together is a reality is already ava. in siemens/rextong, oticon/bernafon wireless aids

    soon, they will be mid price wireless instruments,

    new gen. high end aids, should come EUHA 010

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glucas View Post
    Hi,

    I've been wearing the Phonak Savia Art for about three years and want to upgrade next year to a new aid, preferably a premium model of similar quality. Can anybody make any recommendations for the upgrade. This includes any known releases that will be coming out in the next year.

    Thanks in advance.

    Graham
    Have you enjoyed your Savia Arts?
    What do you like/dislike?
    Perhaps base your upgrade on improvements on your dislikes.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Urban northeast USA
    Posts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hearnow View Post
    The Exelia Art is the generational successor to the Savia Art and offers many new and exciting features. If however, you are willing to wait until April/May 2010 then you might find even better hearing aids of a totaly new generation available to you, thus skipping one generation. This is purely based on the current development cycle and is subject to change. Knowing what some of the features in development are, as discussed at past conferences, you might be better off waiting until then.Broadband WIreless capability will be in its second iteration and super directionality and maybe even active occlusion redution might be introduced. These are likley to significantly improve on hearing in noise.
    My six year old Oticon aids are just not up to par so I'm in the market to take advantage of the many technical improvements that have taken place since I bought my current pair. As much as I would like to buy a new pair soon, I would be willing to wait until April 2010 for even better improvements. Before waiting this long I would like to know how certain it is that this generational jump in technology is really going to take place.
    Thanks for any information you can provide.

  8. #8

    Default

    The Savia Art is a superb aid. It has a smoothness when switching between different listening situations. There are very few situations where I can't hear, whereas in the past, there were many situations where I could not hear at all. I am able to hear in places like noisy restaurants, noisy canteens, with comparative ease. Walking along the road in crowds with noisy traffice I am able to hear individual voices. 10 years ago, this would have been impossible with my Phonak Sonfortes.

  9. Default

    The Exelia Arts have improved on the "soft switching" that you enjoy. You are currently using Autopilot which the fitter can adjust the sensitivity and the transistions between programs. The new core technology uses what is called "Soundflow" which actually blends the programs for an even smoother transition between the programs.

    The Exelia Arts also has Duo Phone...which will wirelessly transmit the phone signal to the opposite ear; which is a really nice feature.
    Not sure if you use a volume control or program button (as you enjoy the autopilot) but the wireless feature is nice because you need only adjust one hearing aid and they will both adjust simultaneously.

  10. Default

    ^^^also...not sure of your hearing loss (please post your audiogram)...but if you have a significant high frequency loss the Exelia Art also uses the "sound recover" technology.

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